Archive for February, 2010

Fly Fishing is a Pain in the Ass

Saturday, February 20th, 2010

kid-tangleOK, before the elitist, Orvis-bedecked types get their feathers ruffled (or hackles up, to milk the pun), know this: I love fly fishing. I love the whistle of the line through the guides, the graceful loops, and the sight of a well-constructed streamer flicking under the surface with a more realistic action than any conventional lure can muster. Fly fishing is artful, old school, and, at times, unbridled fun. But it’s still a raging pain in the keester. If you haven’t fished in a while, your line comes off the reel like a Slinky. Backcasts collapse like a government-run program, and leaders mysteriously tie wind knots that would make a seamstress gasp. (more…)

Fishing Cartoon

Friday, February 19th, 2010

Earl&Water4

Angling is always in season

Saturday, February 13th, 2010

lyonsAngling is always in season for me. In all seasons, I fish or think fish; each season makes its unique contribution, and there is no season of the year when I am not angling.

Nick Lyons, Winter Dreams

Ditch Fishin’

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

We gave the snook a deserved break this past week, opting to fish some remote canals for bass instead. Joe and I did just fine on bass and snook, and Abby and I fished a residential canal minutes from our home over the weekend and scared up a few fish. No records were set, but we took the first step toward a personal 2010 goal: to catch a peacock bass locally. We also brought PITA the Wonder Dog along for her first boat trip, and she showed angling promise. Sadly, we learned that some of the remote canals we fished will soon be filled in as part of the controversial Everglades Restoration Project. I’m sure these people’s hearts are in the right place, but the canals in question and the surrounding land are brimming with fish and other wildlife, including water birds of every stripe, otters, deer, alligators, and a host of assorted, furry critters. I’m doing my best to educate myself about the specifics of the plan, and I’d appreciate any insight our readers can provide.

Pythonasaurus Eatimus YerAssicus

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

rock-python Oh my toothyness.

A week or so ago I saw a report that wildlife officers had found a 14-foot long African Rock python in the Everglades National Park. Now, I know more and more large, exotic pythons are being found in the Park as the result of brain-dead imbeciles people releasing them into the wild, but this version is apparently capable of growing to 20 feet, and it’s a notoriously vicious breed that eats everything from goats to crocodiles to wild hogs. Oh, and the occasional human. One scientist quipped “It’s mean right out of the egg…” I see. Intrigued, I did a quick image search and found the above image of a diamond-patterned demon rock python biting a wire fence, displaying a world-class set of chompers in the process. Four layers of them, to be precise – in case the first two rows of paring knives don’t close the deal, I presume. ┬áNow, I realize the media loves to overhype this stuff and I doubt they’re the savage threat to humans that a host of hyperbolic articles imply, but when I venture into the Glades later this week to scare up some bass I’ll likely be a bit more timid when retrieving a snagged lure. In fact, I may be downright prissy.