Posts Tagged ‘line’

Fly Fishing is a Pain in the Ass

Saturday, February 20th, 2010

kid-tangleOK, before the elitist, Orvis-bedecked types get their feathers ruffled (or hackles up, to milk the pun), know this: I love fly fishing. I love the whistle of the line through the guides, the graceful loops, and the sight of a well-constructed streamer flicking under the surface with a more realistic action than any conventional lure can muster. Fly fishing is artful, old school, and, at times, unbridled fun. But it’s still a raging pain in the keester. If you haven’t fished in a while, your line comes off the reel like a Slinky. Backcasts collapse like a government-run program, and leaders mysteriously tie wind knots that would make a seamstress gasp. (more…)

Fishing Tip: unkink twisted fishing line

Monday, January 11th, 2010

reel-tangleLures that tend to tumble or spin when cast or retrieved (jigs, softbaits, etc) can put a lot of unwanted twist in your line, which in turn leads to tangles, birds-nests, and lots of colorful language. Using a swivel (the smallest version possible for a stealthy profile) when attaching your leader line will minimize the problem. But if your line does end up all kinked and springy, here’s the cure: simply snip off the lure and feed line from your reel while your boat is underway. Feed out about 75 yards of line, let is unwind for a minute or so, then reel it back in. If you’re land-bound, try tying your line to a fixed object, feed line from the reel as you walk away, untie the line and “snap” the rod as you refill the spool to work out the kinks. Voila: straightened, smoother-casting line.

Fishing Tip: use monofilament behind braided line

Monday, November 10th, 2008

By now most spin and baitcast anglers have learned the virtues of braided line, including its memory-free makeup and the distance it adds to the average cast. But “braid” takes some getting used to, and must be in a different manner than monofilament line. One tip that makes a big difference: instead of adding braid directly to your spool, start with 50 yards or so of mono. This “backing” offers several advantages: 1) it’s easier to tie to the spool, since slick braid makes knot-tying a challenge, 2) it limits the amount of expensive braid you’ll use with each re-spool and 3) it prevents line that’s under pressure from slipping on the spool. For best results, use a uni-knot to attach the two lines.