Posts Tagged ‘redfish’

Creek Crawlin’

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

Putting through Alligator Creek...which was indeed loaded with gators

Over the holiday break I had a chance to get back down into the Everglades—the perfect opportunity to let the new outboard on my little skiff stretch its legs. I followed my buddy Joe and his dad in his boat, and we wound our way through tight creeks and fished deep backcountry spots on a warm, breezy day. We caught our share of reds and snook, and the little skiff ran well. In a pending post I’ll detail the recent and long-overdue upgrades, since I know how much anglers enjoy discussing gear. In short, I’m back in the game—just in time for what is some of the best backcountry fishing of the year.

Wind-borne Reds

Thursday, July 22nd, 2010

I headed out solo this evening to try my luck on a nearby flat, knowing full well that the wind was cooking at 17 knots or so. Sure enough, the bay was chopped up and ugly, and I considered going home early before spotting a good school of redfish among the waves. I lost two big fish and then landed two thick, copper-sided reds that went back no worse for wear. The school was packed up tight and very aggressive, sending baitfish fleeing as they moved across the flat. I believe they would have hit anything that moved: lures, personal flotation devices, small barnyard animals, you name it. Their raw power was stunning; when they exploded on top they literally knocked the paint off my lures. Epic stuff on a windy evening…and uncanny timing given the latest fishing tip, below.

Fishing Tip: find fish in cold weather

Thursday, December 10th, 2009

dark-bayIn winter months “down south”, cold weather, wind gusts and low tides can make shallow-water angling a real challenge. But, as with most things in life, you can find a silver lining if you look hard enough. In Florida specifically, redfish and especially snook will move inland as the thermometer drops, and they can often be found “sunning” in protected bays, especially those with dark mud bottoms that soak up and hold the sun’s heat. Move into such areas slowly, use a good set of glasses to look for moving or stationary fish and slow down the presentation of your lure or fly.